The Manic side of Bipolar

Friday, May 06, 2016 0 Comments A+ a-

Manic bipolar is commonly misunderstood. From the different captions to the different philosophies in a bid to explain the manic side of depression, there seem to be a diversity of information on this subject. Notwithstanding, I like the way webmd.com puts it, 
A manic episode is a period of abnormally elevated mood and high energy, accompanied by abnormal behavior that disrupts life.” 
One major characteristic of people who are drifting into the manic side of bipolar is the frequent flow of thoughts or imaginations. I experienced this as 2012 came to a gradual end. I had great thoughts and creative imaginations, I ‘dreamed’ while my eyes were wide open. They were good thoughts and great imaginations. In retrospect, the mere fact that I wrote illegibly on my notepad without pausing was an indication that I had lost control of my thoughts. How in the world did I ever come out of that? Well, eventually, I was diagnosed with bipolar, admitted into a psychiatry hospital, and placed on medication and counselling.

Today, I want to share a few tips on how to recognise that an individual is drifting into manic depression.
  1. They talk fast. Very fast. Sometimes without pausing to take a breath.
  2. They dream big. So big that it becomes unrealistic or unachievable. Most times, their dreams do not match their passion or natural skills.
  3. They become overly conscious of themselves. They suddenly become aware of the pair of shoes, sun glasses or outfits that have been in their closet for years! They become sensitive to discussions, words or things that they ordinarily would not have given much thought to. They seem to develop a sensitive self-esteem or ego, as the case may be.
  4. They become irritable. Usually, their display of anger far outweighs the cause of the irritation.
  5. They stay awake at night trying to solve a problem they can fix in the morning! They stay at wake at night consistently without a feeling of exhaustion or the thought to slow down. They become so focused on their objective and give great reasons why they have to do this. Often, they hide under the guise of a book, a movie, a project, laundry, writing, praying, etc.
  6. They have the feeling of a superman. I can do everything, if only I will spend more time, and focus. In manic depression, the flow of energy is remarkable. So, just as they feel they can do it, they actually go ahead to do so. The only snag could be inconsistency in their results.

These are the few I can think of now. As you know, I am not a doctor or a trained psychologist. I am sharing this from my own experience and from general observations. So if you observe any of the above signs, don’t hesitate to bring it to the knowledge of your doctor or psychologists.

Please do not make the mistake of telling the person involved or with manic depression about the signs you have noticed in them. If you do, they will never take you serious or believe you, and you may even upset them. In my case, my girlfriend in school observed the signs, informed my dad, and ensured that I was taken home. From home, I was sent on bed rest with medication and medical counseling to ensure I recover. And of course, I recovered! Otherwise, I wouldn’t be here writing this piece. I am sharing this to ignite hope in your heart. Even though you do not understand how things will turn out eventually because of the seemingly difficult situation or state of mental health of your loved one, know that recovery is possible and achievable.

My name is Precious, I was bipolar and I live a full life.

Prayer:
Lord, grant me the wisdom to focus on what is important. Grant me the grace to live above the limitations that come with bipolar. Above all, Lord, heal every part of my being and make me whole indeed, in Jesus name, Amen.

Reference:
For more details about Manic Depression, Depression and Bipolar Click http://bit.ly/1VBSBWq to read Dr. John Grohol’s article titled, “What’s the Difference Between Depression and Manic Depression?” Or Click http://www.webmd.com/bipolar-disorder/guide/bipolar-1-disorder to read webmd’s article on Bipolar.
Picture: canva.com


Due to more comments it may take more time to respond to your comment since i 'll like to read all. Thanks